Monday, February 22, 2016 | By: Rudi Butt

Job Witchell Article Supplemental Notes

Updated July 27, 2016

Introduction

This page contains supplemental information to the article titled Job And James Henry Witchell: The Story Of A Corrupted Police Inspector And His Son, A Briton Wanted In USA For White Slavery. An image zoom plugin has been installed to enable detailed viewing of images. A magnifying glass will appear when the cursor hovers over an image.

Appendix

I. Descendants of Job Witchell

Samuel Job Witchell [m1. Maud Mary Powell; m2. Minnie Vera Bale]
11Robert Charles Witchell [m. Violet Evelyn (s.n.)]
111Robert George Witchell
112M.D. Witchell [m. Ernest Louis Pinguet]
113Elizabeth Maude Witchell [m1. Adolphe Marie Ghislain Philipens; m2. James Jolly]
114Violet May Witchell [m. Lindsay Tasman Ride]
115Elevelyn Witchell [m. Ian MacRobert]
116Charles Henry Witchell
12James Henry Witchell [m1. Mabel May Goodfellow; m2. Felicie L. Helene Dansan]
121Cecil James Witchell [m. Thelma Belle Smith]
122Percy Witchell
123Dorothy Audrey Witchell [b.1914/10/31; m. McNutt]1231Magaret Ann McNutt
124George Witchell
125Lilian Mary Witchell [from Dansan; m. Comte Alexander de Marenches]1251Anselme de Marenches
13George Bernard Witchell [m. Dorothy A. (s.n.)]
131Eileen Alice Mary Witchell [m. Henry Francis Bolland]
132Norah Evelyn Witchell [m. Arthur Desmond Stutchbury]
14Lilian Mary Witchell [m. Kenneth William Kirkland Wilson]
141Frank Archibald Hamilton Wilson1411Mary Rose Wilson
142John Kirkland Wilson
143Kenneth Mackenzie Wilson
144Percy Powell Wilson
145James Walter Wilson
146Kenneth Wilson
15Edith Ethel Witchell [m. Robert Grindley Southerton]
151Muriel Vera Southerton [m1.Cedric Arthur Mason; m.2 Lyster Curling Friend]1511Robert Friend
152Robert Grindley Southerton [m. Dorothy Jessop]1521Lorna Rosa Southerton
1522Janette Edith Southerton


II. Documents

Birth Certificate of Job Witchell. Courtesy Margaret Ann McNutt.
Marriage Certificate of Maud Mary Powell and Job Witchell. Courtesy Margaret Ann McNutt.
Birth Certificate of Lilian Mary Witchell. Courtesy Mary Rose Kingman.
Death Certificate of Robert Charles Witchell. Courtesy Mary Rose Kingman.
Wedding Announcement of Helene Danson and Albert Normandin. Courtesy Margaret Ann McNutt.
Letter sent by British Acting Consul General to Helene Danson Normandin, dated October 1, 1943, in reply to her inquiry regarding the whereabouts of Cecil James Witchell. Courtesy Margaret Ann McNutt.
Letter sent by Colonial Office to Lilian Mary Witchell, dated February 26, 1951, in reply to her inquiry regarding information of James HenryWitchell. Courtesy Margaret Ann McNutt.
Ode of Welcome composed by Edmund Charles Blunden, Professor of English Literature (1953-64), University of Hong Kong for the party to celebrate the marriage of Violet May Witchell and Lindsay Tasman Ride. The date was November 12, 1954. Credit: Journal of the Hong Kong University Medical Society, 1954.


III. Courtroom Participants in the Witchell Trial

Presiding Judge
John Worrell Carrington (1898). Credit: The History of the Laws and Courts of Hong Kong
John Worrell Carrington, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.
Carrington, b.1847, Barbados – d. February 13, 1913; BA, Lincoln College, University of Oxford (1868); qualified, Lincoln's Inn (1872); DCL, University of Durham (1879), LLD. Barbados (1874-82), Judge, Assistant Court of Appeal (1874-75); Solicitor General (1878-82). Islands of Saint Lucia and Tobago (1882-89), Chief Justice (1882-89); Government Administrator, Tobago (1883-85). British Guiana (1889-96), Attorney General (1889-96). Hong Kong (1896-1902), Chief Justice of the Supreme Court (May 16, 1896); Member, Governing Body of Queen's College (May 23, 1896); Chairman, Squatters' Board (July 22, 1896); Commandant, HKVCD (1896- October 17, 1901); Chairman, ad hoc committee “to inquire into and report on certain applications for increase of salary from officers in the public service of this colony” (1897); retired due to ill health (April 1, 1902), with pension ($2,437.50 pa). Honor: CMG (January 28, 1888), Queen's Counsel (1890), Knight (1897). Married Catherine Walsh. Had issues: Edward Worrell Carrington (b.1889; Temporary Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps; killed in action Cite St Elie, France, September 27, 1915; Military Cross 1915, Mentioned in Dispatches, twice.).
Prosecution
John Joseph Francis, instructed by Crown Solicitor, Henry Lardner Dennys, who in turn took instructions from the Attorney-General, William Meigh Goodman
Francis
Dennys, arrived Hong Kong (ca.1865); articled clerk for John Joseph Francis; admitted to practice in Hong Kong as an attorney, solicitor and proctor (1874); Clerk to the Chief Justice (April 1, 1874, vice Henry James Holmes), private practice (1895- ); Crown Solicitor (December 1, 1896, vice Alfred Bulwer Johnson, resigned); Freemason (Perseverance #1165, Hong Kong, English Constitution).
Goodman, b.1847, London; BA, University of London (1867); qualified at the Middle Temple (1870); British Honduras (1883-89), Attorney General (1883-86), Chief Justice (1886-89); Hong Kong (1890-1905), Attorney General, and Admiralty Advocate (March 22, 1890); acting Colonial Secretary (May 30, 1891); acting Chief Justice (March 6, 1895, April 5, 1899); Chief Justice of the Supreme Court (vice Carrington, April 1, 1902 - April 27, 1905, retired). Honor: King's Counsel 1900; Knight.
Defense
E. Robinson, instructed by G.C.C. Master
Robinson
Master
Jury
There were two types of jurors in Hong Kong at the time, namely: special jurors and common jurors. Provisions in article 4 of the Ordinance #7 of 1845, “An Ordinance for the Regulation of Jurors and Juries”, described the qualifications of a special juror: "... who shall be an esquire or person of higher degree, or who shall carry on the trade or business of a banker or merchant..." Put simply, special jurors were eminent residents, and the common jurors were by and large their employees. A special jury only became available if at least one side of the court case made an application to the court and accordingly paid for the expenses of the special jury. In the Witchill case, I believe, the prosecution applied and paid for the special jury. The jurors are listed according to the order written in the story titled “The Police Scandal” published in the August 4, 1897 issue of the Hong Kong Telegraph. Whether or not the order in which the names were written has any significance is unknown.
Richard Howard Marten – b. December 18, 1860; went to China for Arnhold, Karberg & Co. (1878); joined Merchant, Radecker & Co. (1886) as Managing Partner in Hong Kong; address: #1 Wyndham Street (1897).
William Hutton Potts - Secretary, Dairy Farm Co.; address: The Peak (1897).
Stephen Cornelius Michaelsen 密開森 – German national; merchant; Melchers & Co.; Consul of Imperial Russian and Consul of Royal Austro-Hungarian in Hong Kong (1887 till at least 1898); address: Praya Central (1897).
Alexander Findlay Smith – merchant; MacEwen Frickel & Co.; address: The Peak (1897).
Thomas Isaac Rose - Secretary, Hong Kong & Whampoa Dock Co., Ltd.; address: The Hut, Castle Road (1897).
Edward William Mitchell – b.1855; went to China (1878); wine merchant; Caldbeck MacGregor & Co.; address: #1 Seymour Terrace (1897).
Francis George Collins - Local Secretary, Hong Kong & China Gas Co., Ltd.; address: Gas Works (1897).


IV. Sarasota Herald-Tribune, February 14, 1944, p.4, Charlie Chaplin To Surrender On Mann Act

Charlie Chaplin, who once shuffled into the hearts of moviegoers on flapping feet and springy cane, is scheduled to surrender to the United States marshal today to be fingerprinted and booked on Mann act and conspiracy charges. The comedian's attorney, Jerry Giesler, announced that Chaplin would appear in response to the indictments voted last week by the federal grand jury which investigated complaints of Joan Berry, 24, who accuses him of fathering her 4-month-old daughter. Also expected to surrender were several of the six other defendants accused with the 54-years-old actor of conspiring to deprive the young film aspirant of her constitutional rights after her arrest on a vagrancy charge in nearby Beverly Hills a year ago last month. Alleged Intimidation. It is alleged that she was intimidated into leaving California through suspension of a police court sentence.
The Man act allegation – connected with the asserted conspiracy – contend that Chaplin transported Miss Berry to New York in October, 1942, with intent to have her “engaged in illicit sex relations with him,” and that he later return her here.
Co-defendants with Chaplin in the conspiracy indictments are City Judge Charles Griffin of Beverly Hills; Capt. W.W. White, Lt. Claude Marple and Matron Jessie Billie Reno, of the Beverly Hills police department; Robert Arden, radio commentator, and Thomas Wells Durrant, at various times an employee of film studios.


V. People who died in the King Edward Hotel Fire

Douglas James Robsonassistant to HMS naval store officer
Mrs. [s.n.] Robsonwife of Douglas James Robson
Stephen Kish2nd Class Seaman, USS Memphis.
William WoodsFar Eastern representatives of W.E. Woods, Company, of Wellington, New Zealand, owner of the Great Woods Peppermint Cure
P. Bailliea French national
Enos SethSeth Carr and Company, London
Dr. Wong Yuk-yingwife of Tsui Kam-shiu, of #36, Pak Tse Road, Canton
Wong Kwong-shiubrother of Dr. Wong Yuk-ying
Cheung Hei-kang 鐘喜賡secretary to General Chan Ming-shu
Leung Kwana room boy of the hotel
Ng Ka-yuena kitchen boy of the hotel


VI. Hong Kong Daily Press, January 18, 1933, p.12, Dealings with Moneylenders, R.G. Witchell in Bankruptcy, Yesterday's Public Examination

The Chief Justice, Sir Joseph Kemp, sitting in Bankruptcy proceedings at the Supreme Court yesterday, declared the public examination closed of Mr. Robert George Witchell, a Government clerk, residing at the Airlie Hotel. The question of installments to be paid by the debtors was put back for further consideration.... Wife's Liabilities In December 1930, he went to Shanghai to be married. He borrowed $400 from Mahan Singh, for which he signed for $800, for fares to Shanghai and marriage expenses. Prior to that date he had borrowed $150 to send to his fiancee in Shanghai. He returned to the Colony and in anticipation of his wife joining him rented a house in Kowloon Tong at $100 a month. For furnishings he borrowed $160. His wife had incurred certain liabilities in Shanghai and stated that she could not come down to Hong Kong until they were settled. He borrowed another $700 of which he sent $600 to Shanghai and kept the other $100 for expenses. His wife came to the Colony in March and they lived together in Kowloon Tong until about August, 1931. His expenses in Kowloon Tong were more than he could meet and his general scale of living was beyond his means. He moved then to a boarding house.
Since 1931, debtor has lived in several boarding houses paying $250 in one place and $180 in another. At present he was paying $175 for his wife and himself at the Airlie Hotel. Mr. Witchell further said that he was obtaining a separation from his wife and he would have to pay her $100 a month and he would require $120 a month for his own expenses. Extravagance Debtor said that since leaving his house in Kowloon Tong he borrowed further monies from Mahan Singh and Amrik Singh.
The Official Receiver: The reason of your bankruptcy is that you incurred these debts to meet your wife's debts and that you have rather extravagant in living on a scale which was not justified? Debtor: Not exactly that. My salary is not big and all the time I have been paying rather interest. But your house in Kowloon Tong was rather expensive? - It was, under the circumstance. What would estimate your monthly expenses besides your board and lodging? About $30 a month. That leaves you $140 a month? - Yes. Witness said his next increment would be in April and it would be £15. Alleged Tale to a Money-lender. Mr. M.A. Silva, for Mahan Singh, a creditor: When you obtained these loans didn't you get them on the representations that you wanted to put them into certain property in Macao? - Debtor: No. Didn't you tell Mahan Singh that you wanted the money to set up a brewery in Macao? - I do not remember that. If Mahan Singh can prove that this money was got for this purpose, you have got the money on misrepresentation – I told him it was for the expenses of my marriage in Shanghai. I have no brewery in Macao. Answering another Indian money-lender credit, Witchell stated that the $500 was borrowed from him in respect of a small distillery of his wife's in Macao. The loan was for setting up the concern.


VII. Full text of the White-Slave Traffic Act, as passed by the Sixty-First Congress on June 25, 1910

CHAP. 395 — An Act to further regulate interstate commerce and foreign commerce by prohibiting the transportation therein for immoral purposes of women and girls, and for other purposes.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the term "interstate commerce," as used in this Act, shall include transportation from any State or Territory or the District of Columbia, and the term "foreign commerce," as used in this Act, shall include transportation from any State or Territory or the District of Columbia to any foreign country and from any foreign country to any State or Territory or the District of Columbia.
SEC. 2. That any person who shall knowingly transport or cause to be transported, or aid or assist in obtaining transportation for, or in transporting, in interstate or foreign commerce, or in any Territory or in the District of Columbia, any woman or girl for the purpose of prostitution or debauchery, or for any other immoral purpose, or with the intent and purpose to induce, entice, or compel such woman or girl to become a prostitute or to give herself up to debauchery, or to engage in any other immoral practice; or who shall knowingly procure or obtain, or cause to be procured or obtained, or aid or assist in procuring or obtaining, any ticket or tickets, or any form of transportation or evidence of the right thereto, to be used by any woman or girl in interstate or foreign commerce, or in any Territory or the District of Columbia, in going to any place for the purpose of prostitution or debauchery, or for any other immoral purpose, or with the intent or purpose on the part of such person to induce, entice, or compel her to give herself up to the practice of prostitution, or to give herself up to the practice of debauchery, or any other immoral practice, whereby any such woman or girl shall be transported in interstate or foreign commerce, or in any Territory or the District of Columbia, shall be deemed guilty of a felony, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine not exceeding five thousand dollars, or by imprisonment of not more than five years, or by both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.
SEC. 3. That any person who shall knowingly persuade, induce, entice, or coerce, or cause to be persuaded, induced, enticed, or coerced, or aid or assist in persuading, inducing, enticing or coercing any woman or girl to go from one place to another in interstate or foreign commerce, or in any Territory or the District of Columbia, for the purpose of prostitution or debauchery, or for any other immoral purpose, or with the intent and purpose on the part of such person that such woman or girl shall engage in the practice of prostitution or debauchery, or any other immoral practice, whether with or without her consent, and who shall thereby knowingly cause or aid or assist in causing such woman or girl to go and be carried or transported as a passenger upon the line or route of any common carrier or carriers in interstate or foreign commerce, or any Territory or the District of Columbia, shall be deemed guilty of a felony and on conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine of not more than five thousand dollars, or by imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years, or by both fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.
SEC. 4. That any person who shall knowingly persuade, induce, entice or coerce any woman or girl under the age of eighteen years from any State or Territory or the District of Columbia to any other State or Territory or the District of Columbia, with the purpose and intent to induce or coerce her, or that she shall be induced or coerced to engage in prostitution or debauchery, or any other immoral practice, and shall in furtherance of such purpose knowingly induce or cause her to go and to be carried or transported as a passenger in interstate commerce upon the line or route of any common carrier or carriers, shall be deemed guilty of a felony, and in conviction there of shall be punished by a fine of not more than ten thousand dollars, or by imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years, or by both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.
SEC. 5. That any violation of any of the above sections two, three, and four shall be prosecuted in any court having jurisdiction of crimes within the district in which said violation was committed, or from, through, or into which any such woman or girl may have been carried or transported as a passenger in interstate or foreign commerce, or in any Territory or the District of Columbia, contrary to the provisions of any of said sections.
SEC. 6. That for the purpose of regulating and preventing the transportation in foreign commerce of alien women and girls for purposes of prostitution and debauchery, and in pursuance of and for the purpose of carrying out the terms of the agreement of project of arrangement for the suppression of the white-slave traffic, adopted July twenty-fifth, nineteen hundred and two, for submission to their respective governments by the delegates of various powers represented at the Paris conference and confirmed by a formal agreement signed at Paris on May eighteenth, nineteen hundred and four, and adhered to by the United States on June sixth, nineteen hundred and eight, as shown by the proclamation of the President of the United States, dated June fifteenth, nineteen hundred and eight, the Commissioner-General of Immigration is hereby designated as the authority of the United States to receive and centralize information concerning the procuration of alien women and girls with a view to their debauchery, and to exercise supervision over such alien women and girls, receive their declarations, establish their identity, and ascertain from them who induced them to leave their native countries, respectively; and it shall be the duty of said Commissioner-General of Immigration to receive and keep on file in his office the statements and declarations which may be made by such alien women and girls, and those which are hereinafter required pertaining to such alien women and girls engaged in prostitution and debauchery in this country, and to furnish receipts for such statements and declarations provided for in this act to the persons, respectively, making and filing them. Every person who shall keep, maintain, control, support or harbor in any house or place for the purpose of prostitution, or for any other immoral purpose, any alien woman or girl within three years after she shall have entered the United States from any country, party to the said arrangement for the suppression of the white-slave traffic, shall file with the Commissioner- General of Immigration a statement in writing setting forth the name of such alien woman or girl, the place at which she is kept, and all facts as to the date of her entry into the United States, the port through which she entered, her age, nationality, and parentage, and concerning her procuration to come to this country within the knowledge of such person, and any person who shall fail within thirty days after such person shall commence to keep, maintain, control, support, or harbor in any house or place for the purpose of prostitution, or for any other immoral purpose, any alien woman or girl within three years after she shall have entered the United States from any of the countries, party to the said arrangement for the suppression of the white-slave traffic, to file such statement concerning such alien woman or girl with the Commissioner-General of Immigration, or who shall knowingly and willfully state falsely or fail to disclose in such statement any fact within his knowledge or belief with reference, to the age, nationality, or parentage of any such alien woman or girl, or concerning her procuration to come to this country, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction shall be punished by a fine of not more than two thousand dollars, or by imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or by both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court. In any prosecution brought under this section, if it appear that any such statement required is not on file in the office of the Commissioner- General of Immigration, the person whose duty it shall be to file such statement shall be presumed to have failed to file said statement, as herein required, unless such person or persons shall prove otherwise. No person shall be excused from furnishing the statement, as required by this section, on the ground or for the reason that the statement so required by him, or the information therein contained, might tend to criminate him or subject him to a penalty or forfeiture, but no person shall be prosecuted or subjected to any penalty or forfeiture under any law of the United States for or on account of any transaction, matter, or thing, concerning which he may truthfully report in such statement, as required by the provisions of this section.
SEC. 7. That the term "Territory," as used in this Act, shall include the district of Alaska, the insular possessions of the United States, and the Canal Zone. The word "person," as used in this Act, shall be construed to import both the plural and the singular, as the case demands, and shall include corporations, companies, societies, and associations. When construing and enforcing the provisions of this Act, the act, omission, or failure of any officer, agent, or other person, acting for or employed by any other person or by any corporation, company, society, or association, within the scope of his employment or office, shall in every case be also deemed to be the act, omission, or failure of such other person, or of such company, society, or association as well of that of the person himself.
SEC. 8. That this Act shall be known and referred to as the "White-slave traffic Act." Approved, Sixty-First Congress, June 25, 1910.


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